The Wal-Mart Experience That Has Captured Us All.

7 11 2010

“Wal-Mart is a retail planet with a gravitational pull so strong it shapes our economic universe in ways we can barely comprehend.” – Bob Thompson, The Washington Post

The above quote sums up Wal-Mart pretty well.

From a consumer point of view, it certainly seems like a planet. If you need something, Wal-Mart has it. There’s no trouble getting there, since they’re everywhere. And once you get there, there is no problem parking in an endless supply of pavement and white lines. Inside, there is an endless supply of whatever it is you came for – and whatever it is you didn’t come for, but… its so cheap, why the heck not?

“Push” is a strategy in marketing whereby a company  “pushes” the product in customer’s faces, hoping they will buy it. These companies try to attract returning customers to build brand loyalty. Of course, there has to be an incentive for customers to come back – Wal-Mart’s incentive is economic. Wal-Mart is synonymous with the words “rollback” and “low prices”. Its cheap prices combined with our society’s love for material goods keeps customers coming back, under the guise of saving money.

When compared to other retailers, you are technically saving money. Instead of spending $10 on a shovel, you spend $4. How Wal-Mart gets you is when you don’t need a shovel. Economic theory assumes that we are all rational. In reality, that’s not true. Your eye catches the happy face with bright letters that exclaim “ROLLBACK!”, and the bold numbers that seem to yell the price at you. Immediately, you start to rationalize: “well, it’s going to be winter and I’m going to need to shovel. The one I have in the garage is starting to look old. What if I want to buy it later? I might as well buy it now and save myself another trip.” And the same thing happens with ten other items and you walk out of Wal-Mart with ten things you don’t need, and you have no idea what just happened. Read the rest of this entry »

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